Adventures in Iceland – 7 Incredible Experiences

It’s tough to see everything Iceland has to offer, especially so if you only have a few days. That’s exactly why we compiled our 7 Favorite Adventures in Iceland. If you have the time and the funds, you have to check them out during your trip! Enjoy!

Some travelers like to pick a location and stay there for the duration of their vacation, but not us. We like to get out and explore! Most of the time this means we spend a lot of time in the car driving. After all that downtime we tend to pick some fairly adventurous activities at our next stop. These seven adventures in Iceland are just that, adventures!

These activities are found all around Iceland’s ring road and are in no particular order. They’re just seven places/tours/things that we would love to try given the chance. Some are well within are budget, and some we’ll have to save for. Either way, we’re sure there’s an adventure in Iceland that’s within your budget and your time constraints!

Hey there! Don’t forget to pin our guide to the Best Adventures in Iceland for later 🙂

Want to learn more about Iceland? Check out our other posts on the Land of Fire and Ice!

Ice Cave Tour

While dreaming about the endless adventures in Iceland, the ice caves were immediately added to our itinerary. Too bad we didn’t look at the price until we started actually planning. These tours are still fairly reasonable, around $150 to $250 a person, but at the time we couldn’t spare the cash.

On the bright side, most ice cave tours last between 3 and 5 hours. If you really splurge, you can go for the full-day volcano and ice cave tour. It lasts for around 11 hours and should be included on any bucket list. After pick up in Reykjavik, you visit epic landscapes, hike on glaciers, tour the ice caves, and watch the roaring river rush down Iceland’s most famous waterfalls. Any number of tour companies offer great services, just give it a search and see which fits your budget!

Helicopter Tour

If you haven’t already guessed, this activity also got crossed off our list for the price. Iceland is exceptionally unique from the ground, but seeing the landscape from above would be magical! If you do have the funds by all means try it out. Most tours leave right from Reykjavik and last for 1-2 hours.

While the tour its self is breathtaking, the price will also leave you gasping for air. A quick 1 hour jaunt will cost you upwards of $250 per person. Want to head further inland? Get ready to fork over around $1,500 a person. While at the time it wasn’t in our budget, if we get the chance to return we’ll make it a priority. We better start saving!

Seljalandsfoss

Seljalandsfoss, a waterfall in southern Iceland, is probably Iceland’s most famous waterfall. Sure Skogafoss and others are incredible, but just look at that! The Seljaland River falls almost 200 feet into the pool below and it really is a sight to behold. The best part, they built up a boardwalk to let visitors walk behind the falls!

Most day tours from Reykjavik include a stop at the falls but to truly appreciate it try arriving earlier than the crowds. During the day you’re bound to be surrounded by tourists, but come early and you may get lucky. The falls are located just off the Ring Road so the drive is doable in any vehicle.

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Glacier Hike in the Highlands

**F-Roads are Iceland’s most dangerous roads, but they take you to some of the most incredible places. If you plan on visiting the highlands, you MUST rent a 4×4 vehicle. Two wheel drive vehicles are not allowed, as some roads are impassable without four wheel drive. Be cognizant of road closures as F-Roads are not open year-round, so be sure to check your route and avoid any closed roads.

The highlands are chalked full of canyons, waterfalls, hot pools, and glaciers. It’s like walking in a dream. To really get a feel for the most unique adventures in Iceland you have to go into the highlands. If you go through a tour operation, guides will even take you out onto the massive glaciers to see Iceland at it’s finest. If you go it alone, stay on designated trails and be sure to rent a 4×4 vehicle.

Whale Watching Tour

While Icelandic wildlife on land is somewhat lacking, the waters surrounding are a different story. It’s very common to spot humpback whales, orcas, belugas, porpoises, seals, and much more patrolling the local waters. The endless fjords of West and North Iceland are the best spots for an up close encounter. In fact, we spotted whales just 100 meters off the shore in our car driving through the Westfjords.

If you have the chance we’d recommend starting your tour up North in Akureyri or Húsavík. Your chances of seeing whales are extremely high regardless of the season and the prices are comparable to others in the area. Most tours are around $75 to $100 per person and last 3 to 5 hours.

Myvatn Nature Baths

Myvatn Nature Baths is the North’s answer to the Blue Lagoon. Located  between Akureyri and Egilsstaðir, it offers many of the same amenities as the Blue Lagoon, but is much farther the airport and thus there are fewer tourists. The lakes surrounding the lagoon are pristine high alpine pools and leave the view to the surroundings unimpeded.

You can enjoy these views via the expansive infinity pool at the lagoon. The crowd is a nice mix of locals and tourists (a rarity in Iceland!). After a relaxing dip you can enjoy the dining options on campus or begin your journey home. You can expect to spend an hour to return Akureyri or two to Egilsstaðir.

See the Northern Lights

The northern lights are most visible in Iceland between November and April (when there’s the least amount of sunlight per year). Unfortunately for us, we went in mid-May, and were unable to catch a glimpse of the famed light show. We undoubtedly will return to experience this adventure in Iceland some winter!

There are many agencies that offer “northern lights tours”; however, they cannot guarantee that you will see the aurora borealis. We suggest seeking out the northern lights on your own. To do so, try:

  1. Getting out of the city and into an area that isn’t affected by light pollution. The darker the sky the better.
  2. Pick a night that isn’t cloudy and doesn’t have a full moon.
  3. Check out http://en.vedur.is/weather/forecasts/aurora/ for an accurate aurora forecast.

Almost forgot? Remember to pin our guide to Seven Adventures in Iceland for later 🙂

Looking for awe inspiring adventures in Iceland? From Iceland Northern Lights to Glacier Hikes and Helicopter Tours in Iceland, we've got you covered! Our guide lists seven bucket-list adventures in Iceland for you to try. Enjoy! www.theagapecompany.com #icelandtravel #visiticeland #luxurytravel #adventuretravel #iceland

As you can there’s an adventure for almost every budget and everyone. From whale watching to hiking the rims of volcanoes, these are the seven adventures in Iceland we would love to try!

So please let us know in the comments below… Have you ever been or would you ever go to Iceland? Which adventure in Iceland would you like to try? Still have questions or comments, let us know in the comments! Where’s your next vacation taking you? Please remember to like and share😊 God Bless, K+J!

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Verse of the Week: Mark 8:36

“What good is it for a man to gain the whole world, but forfeit his soul?”

You can often tell what people value by how they spend their time and money. It’s very easy to look form the outside and say, “I’ll be happy when I’ve done…” or “when I have…”. Part of that is the rise of social media, and always seeing the “perfection” of other’s lives. Instead of chasing fleeting happiness in a trip, new car, or even a 100 likes on a post, search for eternal joy. There is a Savior that loves and cares for you. Devote not only your heart, but your time, and money to him and his kingdom. “For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.” This week, dedicate not only your time to Christ but make an effort to give to his works as well.

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Blue Lagoon Iceland Review – The Truth About Iceland’s Most Famous Attraction

Before our trip to Iceland, we read a ton Blue Lagoon Iceland Reviews. They all followed the same idyllic melody of tranquil waters, amazing facilities, 5-star dining, and incomparable luxury. If your visit goes like ours it won’t be what you’re expecting. Follow along to hear our true thoughts on the Blue Lagoon.

Sure the waters really were blue and the staff was friendly, but the lagoon felt more like an overstuffed hot tub than a geothermal wonder. Online, you’ll see images of an empty lagoon wrapped in snow. It looks like you could wade through the rising steam without ever seeing another person.

In reality, the Blue Lagoon is much more like the world’s largest hot tub party. Sure it’s a very nice hot tub, but it’s a crowded, sweaty hot tub nonetheless. Now if you don’t mind sharing more power to you, but hang on we’ve got plenty more to tell. We hope you enjoy our honest Blue Lagoon Iceland Review!

Hey there! Don’t forget to pin our review of the Blue Lagoon for later 🙂

The Best of the Blue Lagoon

The Location

The lagoon is only 20 minutes from the airport and 45 minutes from Reykjavik. It’s perfect for a quick layover adventure or day trip during your stay. The drive from Reykjavik is very easy and fairly well marked. The roads are all paved and maintained so there’s no need to worry about getting stuck if you’re visiting in winter. Trust us that can be a real concern!

If you’re visiting between flights there are numerous tours that leave directly from the airport. Plan ahead and even a 4 hour layover can be spent at the lagoon. Headed back to the Reykjavik after? Check out these Five Free Things to do in Reykjavik!

The Staff

Everyone me met who worked at the lagoon was very kind, helpful, and made it clear they wanted you to enjoy your visit. They do a great job of training their employees and it really shows.

Big bonus: they all spoke English so communication was a breeze. If you’re up to par on your Icelandic, I’m sure they speak it as well! 😉 Besides being easy to communicate with, the staff also seemed to love working at the Blue Lagoon. Who knows why… maybe they get free swims? Either way, it made everything so much enjoyable for us, as I’m sure it will you.

It’s Camera Friendly

For some reason this is left off a lot of other Blue Lagoon Iceland reviews. We guess it’s not a big deal for others, but for people looking to commit their time  to memory you’re in luck! The entirety of the lagoon is camera friendly (with exception of the locker rooms). We noticed many visitors purchased “Blue Lagoon” waterproof phone cases at the entryway. Great marketing plan by the lagoon but you shouldn’t have any trouble without the case. This isn’t a wave pool after all!

Personally, we’d recommend taking them out at the start, getting a couple pictures, and then putting them away. Enjoy the free mud masks and your time instead of hunting the perfect shot. Unless you’re visiting in the shoulder season you’ll have a tough time finding it.

The Water

The water at the Blue Lagoon is definitely as advertised. It’s kind of a foggy, opaque blue in direct sun but shifts to the vibrant hue as the light becomes less harsh. Temperature wise, it’s pretty much like swimming in a giant hot tub (this time in a good way). With warm and cold areas, temperatures range anywhere from 98° F to 104° F.

We actually found some cool facts about the lagoon’s famous waters. The source of the water is over 6,500 feet below the earth’s surface and within 48 hours all of the water is recycled. Meaning, in only 2 days the pool has “emptied” and refilled itself with hot, clean, blue, geothermal water. Overall, the lagoon holds around 1.5 million gallons of water. That’s like filling 30,000 bathtubs to the brim!

As you can see, the lagoon clearly has its draw. Its waters, staff, and location are all spectacular, and being able to use your camera is a big plus. On the other hand, there are also some major drawbacks. Read on to hear our least favorite parts about the lagoon in our Blue Lagoon Iceland review!

Want to learn how to save hundreds on flights? Sign up for our newsletter and we’ll send you our exclusive guide for free! In it, we share our favorite secret travel hacks that consistently save us hundreds of $$$ on airfare. Sign up to save for yourself!

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The Worst of the Blue Lagoon

To be clear, we’re not saying we didn’t enjoy our time at the Blue Lagoon. In fact, we’d recommend it to anyone who has the time and funds to visit. We’re saying not everything about the lagoon was as magical as we were led to believe. In other Blue Lagoon Iceland reviews it was built up to be something it wasn’t. Ultimately, we hope to present the information fairly to you and let you make your own decision.

The Cost(s)

When we visited the price was around $70 a person for the bare minimum entrance pass. While they clearly have a right to charge for their beautiful facilities and a dip in the tranquil waters, the price seems outrageously high. We saw a stat that 80% of the countries 500,000 annual tourists visit the Blue Lagoon. That means 400,000 people visit the Blue Lagoon Iceland each and every year. This number is only going up as Iceland continues to grow in popularity.

What really bothered us most were the hidden charges. Sure you could get towels, face masks, and entrance to private pools, but only if you were willing to fork over your wallet. The additional charges left a bad taste in our mouths and had us feeling like the invitee to a country club pool. You know, the one who shows up with the big glob of white sunscreen on their nose. On the bright side, kids are free, and teens are around half price.

The Crowds

In the sake of honesty, the picture above was taken in a cove, around midday in the shoulder season. It better represents how the Blue Lagoon would look at it’s emptiest. As Iceland continues to grow in popularity, the lagoon will only get busier. One can only imagine what the lagoon will look like in 10 years… we’d guess like an over-stuffed aquarium. To be clear, all Blue Lagoon Iceland reviews mention the crowds as the main downside.

The crowds begin as soon as you enter, follow you to the lockers, and finally down into the lagoon. Strangely enough, once you work your way into the lagoon the crowds do disperse some. With the exception of high traffic areas like the saunas, silica mask stations, and entrances you can usually find some room to breathe. Shoot for less busy times between 2:00 PM and 4:00 PM or after 6:00 PM to help avoid the people and more richly enjoy your experience.

The Locker Rooms

The Blue Lagoon had stunning facilities and the locker rooms were no exception. There were still a couple problems: the wristbands were terrible, the shower situation was nuts, they were poorly organized. When you arrive you’re given a waterproof wristband that works as your locker key and charge card throughout the Blue Lagoon. My strap didn’t clasp and Kestra’s wrist was too small for the wristband to stay on. I ended up wearing hers’ and pocketing mine so they wouldn’t get lost. They were more of a pain than anything.

In the locker rooms, patrons choose their own lockers and they fill quickly. It’s tough to find a pair or trio of lockers close together if you’re going as a group. They require you to shower before and after hopping in the lagoon. We mean full out stripped down showers. They even have ‘guards’ organizing traffic and making sure you shower. Public showers can be tough for some people so they do offer semi-private curtained showers, but they fill quickly.

The Lack of Instruction

After you pay you really are on your own. We managed to meander our way to the locker rooms and observed the proper steps from there. The time spent in limbo trying to figure out where to go and what to do next was definitely a bummer though. The basic steps after entry are to: find a locker, strip down and shower, get on your suit, and then make your way to the lagoon. After a little random navigating in the locker rooms you should be able to find the showers and the exit.

The Chaos

Some customers seem to forget basic etiquette during their visit. Whether they are having a splash war, running to take the shower, or generally causing a scene, there’s no shortage of poor behavior. The crowds are obviously another key factor here, more people means a higher chance of inappropriate behavior. On the bright side, most people do seem to respect others and their surroundings. Like they say though, one bad apple. If it worries you, avoiding peak times will help to alleviate this problem.

It’s Not Family Friendly

Just trust us! Many of the couples seem to get caught up in the romance of the lagoon. It’s kind of like they’re having their own hot tub party… yuck. If you do take kids along, be sure to stick to open areas of the pool where people are on their best behavior. You can also try to arrive in the middle of the day and most of the issues are mitigated. Again, fewer crowds.

Almost forgot? Remember to pin our honest Blue Lagoon Iceland Review for later 🙂

The Blue Lagoon is Iceland's most famous tourist attraction. Not everything about Iceland's Blue Lagoon is as incredible as it seems. If you're looking for the truth about the Blue Lagoon Iceland then look no further. We'll tell you the honest truth about Iceland's Blue Lagoon! www.theagapecompany.com #iceland #bluelagoon #bluelagooniceland #visiticeland #luxurytravel #adventuretravel

Ultimately, if you have spent the money to get Iceland, we recommend you visit the the Blue Lagoon at least once. While it does have its downsides the tranquil blue waters manage to wash them all away. Our main takeaways would be to be sure to avoid peak times from 10 AM – 2 PM and 4 PM – 6PM, book online beforehand (it’s required), and pack a towel to save a couple bucks.

So please let us know in the comments below… Have you ever been or would you ever go to the Blue Lagoon? After reading our Blue Lagoon Iceland review, would you still visit? Still have questions or comments, let us know in the comments! Where’s your next vacation taking you? Please remember to like and share😊 God Bless, K+J!

Want to read more about Iceland? Check out these posts!

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Verse of the Week: James 1:17

“Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.”

Something we’re trying to incorporate into everyone of our blogs is a quick devotional. As Christians we believe it is important to spread the good news and take account of all we’ve been blessed with. The ability to worship freely, the gift of traveling the earth, having companionship and good friends to share our joys and concerns with, the list of blessings goes on and on. Most importantly, every single one of these gifts have been given to us by our creator. They won’t be taken away or withheld from us. We were made by a loving God who cares for us and wants to see us prosper. This week, we encourage you to take a look at the gifts you’ve received and remember to thank God for them.

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